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Family Fun at Sarge’s Meet-n-Greet and every Thursday night before Graduation....the best!....


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Old 03-16-2009, 02:28 AM   #1
Craig
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Default What happens at bootcamp - Day-per-Day? (Up to week #6)

I am opening this thread to help our fellow deppers get ready for boot camp. This is just a normal routine day at boot camp......

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Night Before: Get sleep at least 1 night or more before ship date. It is essential! This is important!!
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MEPS & Airport

- MEPS processing, as usual, hurry up and wait. Urinalysis, instructions on where/when you will be flying to Great Lakes, IL. Around noon you might be lucky to be leaving for the airport after taking 2nd oath (if active duty only). Family is allowed at MEPS and Airport if they ask for the military gate pass from the airline ticket counter. I really suggest you spend these last few moments with your family or BF/GF. The people you meet going to Great Lakes will mean nothing since you will probably all get different divisions anyways. So don't think you're "bonding", you're not. Your family is the ones who will be there to support you with letters while in boot camp. Just my suggestion...

- You get to O’Hare Airport, get luggage, eat and you have until 22:30 to go to the luggage area or Terminal 2 where the yelling begins (and you thought your mom bitched a lot)! ~ha

- Petty Officers get you in formation, listen, and follow their directions. They look through items you brought and if they don't like it they throw it away right then and there, or donate it.

- You get on the RTC bus which is your last time to talk and ask questions to the Sailor that's accompanying you.
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AT RTC, YOUR NAVY DAY BEGINS

In-processing Day (P-days)
- "P-days" - are at least 5 working days long. It can be longer if there are not enough recruits to form a division.

- "P-hold" - If you're on P-hold it is because you will be waiting for more people to arrive so you have a full division. "P-day" and "P-Hold" do not count as being in boot camp". These days do not count towards your 8 weeks of training. These are just "dead days". Once you have a full division you will start your P-days.

The next 4-5 days after receipt day are known as Processing Days (P-Days). Medical and dental indoc gets done here to make sure you are able to train properly and efficiently. Haircuts are issued and pictures for the ID cards are taken. Most of these P-Days we ended up waking up at 0400 and tapped out at 2000. These are probably the most boring and horrible days of boot camp. You are not allowed to physically train yourself by doing push-ups or sit-ups (PT), and by the end of P-Days I definitely noticed a change to my pectoral strength. You were right Craig, I thought my mom bitch a lot, she was nothing compared to these guys ~ha, it was just a whole bunch of yelling throughout the day and minor lectures along with all of the regular P-Day things was just about it for a week. We also by now should have been learning our chain of command.

The chain of command is vital to know in all cases where conflicts may interfere. You must never jump up the chain of command but if all else fails, the next person up the ladder might be able to help.

At the end of P-Days we did end up moving to our permanent (well...rest of RTC) home: Ship 12, the USS Triton. Every night after the first night consisted of constant talking and lost sleep. Well that was my case anyway. We started day 1-1 of training on the following Tuesday.

I forgot to mention the "Moment of Truth" and the PQS Written Test.

If you read in the DEP guide, you will know that the Moment of Truth is where you can disclose any information that you have hidden. Some people may pretend to be bipolar or anything because they do not like the first couple days. Just stick it out.

If you have done the DEP PQS, you can get advanced from Boot camp if you pass this multiple choice test with 80% or above and passing everything on the Baseline PFA. A lot of questions are common sense, but don't think that if you are really physically fit that you can just get E-2 like that. You must pass both.

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P-1 DAY:
- You walk inside, get in a line one on each side of the bulkheads (walls).

- You get to boot camp you will be given a phone call home to let somebody know you are safe. This is an extremely short phone call (about 30 seconds). Bring a couple of phone number for somebody you know will answer the phone. If you have a cell phone, bring it, it's a lot faster. Heck you can text, if you like. That way if your family or friends don't answer, you can still say something or just leave a voice mail. Having a cell phone usually allows you to talk longer (like 30 seconds)...

- You will then go into "initial issue". Here they will issue your "Ditty Bag". A ditty bag is kind of like a duffle bag, it's just a cloth bag that holds all of your small stuff. They will issue the basic hygiene items and clothing, things that you need to survive.

- Your personal items will be inspected. Most items are not allowed in boot camp, except for important paper work (ie copies of SSN, Marriage certificate, Education records...etc).

- You will change into your Smurf's (New clothing). All of your civilian clothes will either donated, sent home, or thrown away. If you decide that you want to keep that old shirt and jeans, then these items will be sent home. You will place them in a cardboard box, which everyone calls "The Box", and everything is mailed home. In this box will also be items that you are not allowed to have in boot camp, like unneeded paper work, cell phone, ...etc . Everything that will be useless for the next 8 weeks. Remember, you pay for how heavy "The Box" is. Do you really want to keep that old shirt and jeans?

REMEMBER: Tell your parent or whomever about "the box" and the "15 second phone call", PRIOR to you leaving for boot camp. It totally freaks them out because they will get "the box" and with no note or letter. My recommendation is if you do plan on sending something home, don't forget to write a short note to your parents or loved one while you're on the plane. Slip it in your pocket so they have a short note that you're going to be okay and that you appreciate them. Believe me, "the box" is searched for such notes or at least clues as to the final minutes before you seal it up.

Remember also, if you take a Bible, you can write all your addresses in the back and skip bringing an address book.

Lastly, tell your parents if your pants legs are rolled up when they get the box, it's because you didn't have time to roll them down after getting measured for boots. My mom thought for sure that I had been in trouble for wearing baggy jeans. One final thing, make sure your boots fit. We've heard of Recruits suffering the entire time because they didn't want to speak up. Not good!

- You will then have to provide a urine sample for drug testing. If you can't provide a sample, you will stay there until you do. They will keep you awake by having you walk in circles and drink from the skuttlebutt (water fountains). There is no getting out of the urinalysis, you will stay there until you complete the urinalysis. So do it as soon as you can.

- Listen to the Chief's and Petty Officer's (know the difference between them).

- Walk in a military manner, do not talk! Walking in a military manner means you not goofing off, talking, or joking around. You are focused. Remember 1st impressions are lasting. If you want to be micro-managed in boot camp, this is a great opportunity to make yourself known by talking and goofing around.

- They take height and weight.

- They take your picture for your I.D. card, try to not look like a zombie, you keep this for 4 years!!!

- They will ask for those that have any experience (or interest) in drill, musical instruments, or singing. If you do, then you will put you in a special division called the "900 Division". The 900 division recruits will do everything the other recruits do, in addition, they also practice to put on shows at events such as parades, and recruit graduation ceremonies. I always recommend that you don't say you know anything because it doesn't give any more benefits, it actually makes your time in boot camp harder.

- They will also form a special division, called "800 division". All 800 divisions contain Navy SPECOPS which include SEAL's, Navy Divers, EOD & Special Boat Operators. They have different physical requirement in boot camp.

- For the others, they will randomly form a division with up to 87 other recruits.

SLEEP:
You will be taken to a temporary in-processing barracks called a "ship" where you will meet your RDC's and start the inprocessing Days (P-Days). This ship is where you will sleep. In your compartment, which is a large open area which has ~80 racks (beds) lined up. Choose your rack (bed) and 1st bunk-mate. The reason they call the barracks a "ship" is because every barracks at RTC is named for an actual ship. The processing barracks ship (aka ship) is called the USS Pearl Harbor.

- Grab ditty bag, with your notebook in hand and hang ditty bag on rack.

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P-2 Day:
- Up at 0000 (Midnight) Grab notebook and walk out. This is the hardest time to stay awake.

- Once your RDC's receive the division they will start to get you ready for the day. First thing you will do is shave (for males).

- After that you will receive a green guard belt with a canteen. You will be instructed on the proper wear of your guard belt and the importance of proper hydration. You will be required to drink 8 to 12 canteens of water a day.

- Keep hydrated and keep up your posture. Keep your hands away from face.

- Around 0500-0530 they will take you to the galley (where you eat) for breakfast. It's buffet style. NO TALKING IN THE GALLEY!!

- After breakfast you will get your haircut. Haircuts are for both male and females (It's a crappy job even for males), Females should get there haircut before they get to RTC.

- You will then go to Moment of Truth. This is where the Navy will ask you if you ever lied or not spoken the truth about joining up. Everyone gets nervous. Don't freak out. A lot of sailors that are not prepared have problems with this because they have lied all the way to this point. If you have to stand up at the moment of truth, then something is majorly wrong, all these problems should have been voiced prior to this. One thing for sure, at the moment of truth, if you stand up, you'll will be going home. DON'T STAND UP!....

- Secondly, if anyone ask if you are homesick, or have you ever been depressed, or sad"? You say NO!.... We all know the true answer is yes, haven't we all been depressed or sad at one time in our lives? However, if you say yes, and you go see a counselor, you're coming home. You will be kicked out. Try and suck it up. If you truly need help talk to the Chaplin/CARE person, if needed. Try not to even do that, because you will be labeled. The Navy is all about seeing if you can handle stress. In a war zone they can't have someone that needs to see a counselor or Chaplin all the time. It's wasting their time. But let’s say there is a death, then by all means, see the Chaplin only!

Remember being a member on NavyDEP.com, you are one of the few that will know what is about to happen. We love "spilling the beans" here at NavyDEP, it makes life so much easier at boot camp...

- Nukes, EOD, Aircrew, etc are set aside. Nukes go to a Nuke briefing for further criminal record information as well as the CT's and IS's, etc. You may have To-Go lunch in rating office (11:00 - 12:00).

- After that it's back to the galley for lunch.

- Write down Chain-of-Command (it helps if you know it BEFORE!). Study it, learn it, and study the 11 general orders, rank and recognition.

- Go back to temporary ship and get ready to stamp Last Name, Last four of SSN, and Division number on items as well as initial with permanent marker in Recruit Handwriting!

- 17:00 - 18:00 Dinner, Return to ship, hygiene for 8 minutes but that's too long so more like 5 to shower and have pt shorts and shirt, socks and shoes on and at attention in front of rack. Get ready for bed.

- Sleep from 20:00 - 05:30 (which is lucky).

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P-3 DAY:
- This is an early morning. You wake up at 4 am.

- The first thing you will do is go to medical (USS Red Rover) to get your blood drawn. While you are there you will have a bag breakfast.

- Your first marching, but 3 abreast, no front or division body.

- You will then go to the Navy Exchange (NEX) to buy items (females will buy their lady items)

- Items bought in the NEX will be stored in locker compartments.

- More stamping and initialing of uniforms.

- You will go to lunch in the galley.

- After lunch you will get your TB shot. Remember, always hydrate (8 to 12 canteens).

- Then you will go to uniform issue. Here you will receive your NWU's (Navy Working Uniform).

- Dinner, clean the deck in compartment, training, hygiene, Tattoo (lights out) and Taps. You will most likely start Roving and Night watch.
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P-4 DAY:
- This is another early morning. You will go to breakfast at 06:00. Then go back to Red Rover. Here you will go through medical and dental screening. You will eat a bag lunch there. Then back to Red Rover for more vaccine shots and more dental screening.

- Finally, medical will clears you for Fit for Full Duty (FFD). This means you are medically cleared to train. This also means you can Intensive Training Exercises (ITE). You will get done with medical around 3pm.

- You will learn Marching again.

- You will then go to a brief for Montgomery GI Bill (MGIB) and to sign up for a bank account (if you don't have one).

- Then its dinner and training time.

- After dinner you will learned how to fold and stow your uniforms and gear

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P-5 Day:
- Early morning again

- Today is the last day of in processing. You will have to go to a class about UCMJ (Uniformed Code of Military Justice).

- If you have a job that requires a special physical you will go to medical to start that. If you have a low verbal comprehension score on your ASVAB you will screen for F.A.S.T. This is a program to help you understand English, it is a very helpful program.
- Lunch can be between 10:30 - 13:00

- After lunch you will clean the barracks you’re staying in and get ready to move to your new ship (barracks). This is about a 2 mile walk with a sea bag on your back. When you get there you will get situated and eat dinner.

- The rest of the day is getting everything done before you start training.

- Lectures on various procedures, trainee guides, salutations, etc.

- Dinner can be between 17:00 - 19:00

- Laundry Handouts (passing out clean laundry) which is a night routine

- Tomorrow starts your actual boot camp.
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First Sunday
- No holiday routine, No Shaving for Females
- Males must shave every morning
- Go to Chapel and get a religious brief, go to NEX for more supplies, or socks (Editors note: God knows you'll need more socks)
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Week 1:
Week 1 was very boring....just like the last week. Only this time if we screwed up, we would be issued some intensive, or sometimes known as instructional, training (IT). IT consists of various exercises that are horrible for the human body. Though some are good like the sit-ups and push-ups, others are bad for the knees. WE always started off on that black line with my favorite (actually most hated) exercise, 4-count jumping jacks! An RDC's IT card would consist of:
Jumping Jacks (usually 40-50 reps)
Leg Lifts, Left Side (again, 40-50)
8-Count Body Builders (25-30)
4-Count Mountain Climbers (20-30)
4-Count Sit-ups (20-30)
Leg Lifts, Right Side (40-50)
Down...............................Up Push-ups (25 or so)

I changed my mind. Mountain Climbers and the very long down up push-ups are my least favorite 2. With this push-up they will not say up for a good 15 seconds and that gets very tiring.
Sometimes IT sessions also had Squats and Arm Circles thrown into the mix.
Moving on....the whole week was practice for the second week's test and inspections. We had bunk and locker drills every day. We had to fold and stow our gear perfectly and make our bunks with precision and care...all under a horrible time limit, but it wasn't that bad on the actual inspections.

The first test's study materials were for uniforms and grooming, rate and rank recognition, Navy ships and aircraft, and first aid. I was made the Educational Petty Officer (EPO) for the division, so I was in charge of making everyone pass and helping those that didn't study a little harder. At the end of the week was our Baseline Physical Fitness Assessment (PFA). It wasn't counted against us if we failed. They just basically wanted to know where we were at and if we could perform the tasks required for the regular Navy Physical Readiness Tests (PRT's). My age and gender group consisted of a minimum of 46 push-ups, 54 sit-ups and a 12:15 mile and a half run. I passed my run and sit-ups but failed my push-ups by 2. Two weeks without PTing hurt a bit and my rust showed. But I won't beat a dead horse. In a nutshell the first training week was folding clothes, making bunks, introduction to military drill (marching), a little PT, studying, cleaning, and that Baseline PFA.
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1-1 Day:
- Get blood drawn for special jobs (Nuke, Aircrew, EOD, Divers...etc). More tubes of blood, more tests.

- Asked for allergies and if we are FFD (Fit For Duty).

- DEP advancement test is taken today. If you are E-1 or E-2 and want to advance, you need to pass the PQS at your recruiter station AND this test. The test is 30 questions, multiple choices, and you cannot get more than 5 wrong to pass. It tests naval history, Rank and Recognition, Chain-of-Command, 11 General orders, etc... STUDY!!!

- You will send a letter home with your address.

- You will go to recruit receipts. Here you will take care of the rest of your service record. You will do your DDS (Direct Deposit), SGLI (Life Insurance) and receive your military ID.

- Today you will also go to PT. This will be where you learn what exercises you will do during PT (Physical Training).

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1-2 Day:
- Blood Pressure check
- Another urine test for special forces, Nukes, Aircrew, EOD, Divers, etc.
- Eye exam, measure for glasses
- Females will go to wellness center for birth control.
- You have a To-go Lunch
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1-3 Day:
- Dental check up
- X-rays
- Shots (about 4 of them), plus the Peanut Butter shot (It's not bad, Relax!). Then same routine
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1-4 Day:
- More stamping
- Lectures on Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) from training guide.
- Keep studying from training guide.
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1-5 Day:
- First workout, pre-physical fitness test. See how many you can do.
- The air is dry, but keep running, keep pushing, Do not stop! Puke, if you want and keep going.
- Don't stop your heart rate, raise it up. You'll feel good afterwards.
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Second Sunday:
- Holiday routine 07:00 - 13:00
- 13:00 - 14:00 Field day (Clean compartment)
- Dinner
- Lectures
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Week 2:
I thought this week was so important...and then I realized that RDC's live up everything as if it were working on a million dollar piece of equipment. This week had 3 inspections and the academic test that I stated before.

The first two inspections were on the same day and one after the other. They called this the CART PI/DMI. CART is phase 1 of boot camp. I am not sure of exactly what it means, though I do know the other two. PI stands for personnel inspection, while DMI stands for dynamic material inspection. The PI is where they have you do a few commands that they will pass down to the Recruit Chief Petty Officer (RCPO though said as RPOC). A couple of the commands were to:

1 pace forward march
hand salute
cover
uncover
attention
parade rest

Not very hard at all. Well the inspector goes around and checks every single person for uniform infractions. A couple of the infractions, or hits, you could take on your uniform are:

gig line not even (shirt to belt to pants line)
gear adrift (loose threads)
dirty boots
dirty uniform
metal to metal on belt not even
bootlaces not tight enough
belt not through all of the loops
all buttons not buttoned

The inspector would also ask a question about the 11 general orders, chain of command, or rate and rank recognition, and you had to answer it in the correct manner while keeping proper military posture and bearing. Some other hits the inspector could give are:

military posture
military bearing
incorrect or no answer to a question

I actually remember getting my first PI question wrong because I was so nervous and forgot that a perched eagle was part of what a second class petty officer wears on the sleeve of his or her dress blue uniform. Anyway, before we knew it, the PI was over and we did pretty well on it.

Next was the DMI. One side had bunk making, the other with lockers. I was very pleased to have the locker inspection because I hated making a bunk. We had to take out a shirt, trousers, and jacket and unbutton and unzipper everything on them and then re-button and zipper and fold and stow them properly. I took one hit on my jacket's zipper pointing up when I refolded it. Zipper must be down on many things in boot camp. A majority of the bunk making side failed while we did great. To end this day, we were warned of bunk drills ahead because the one side did terrible on it.

Two days later was our zone inspection. This is where FQA inspects every area of the compartment, including the RDC office. We had multiple problems with that office, and I think one of them was dust. Now a petty officer would inspect every top bunk's locker and every bottom bunk's bunk. Since I was a bottom bunk, you would probably think I would fail right? No sir; we were able to make the compartment look good and dress our bunks and lockers accordingly. I had help from a shipmate and my bunk looked really good. After about 2-3 hours of the inspection, we came out with almost the whole division failing. I am glad to say that I was one hit away from failing because the petty officer was going really in depth and was looking for everything that he could find.

Well..another taps and we were ready for our first test! Time to show off my awesome EPO skills, hoo-yah! Well it turns out that I didn't know that our utilities could be regular machine-washed. Our laundry PO's never washed them in our compartment, but that was simply because there was too much clothing to be washed. I made a 4.9 (49/50 correct) on that test, so it wasn't bad at all. We had 2 people fail, and both that I tutored ended up passing the second time around. We got our first achievement flag to march with: the Academic Flag. That was our very stressful second week of training, and now we were off to MCA Phase (Mid Cycle Assessment).
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2-1 Day:
- Personal inspection, DMI,
- uniform and grooming class.
- Special physical for Nukes, Aircrew, etc only
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2-2 Day:
- Study time, study groups
- Start to practice watch with a 8mm Kimar pistol
- Training for WTI inspection (Weapons Turnover Inspection)
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2-3 Day:
- Test one on:
~~First Aid
~~ Enlisted Rate/Rank recognition
~~ Uniform and Grooming
~~ US Navy Ships and Aircraft
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2-4 Day:
- 2nd issue of uniforms, if you have any IOU's from the 1st issue you get them here.
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2-5 Day:
- Dental work, many get wisdom teeth pulled and are SIQ (Sick in Quarters) for 2 days
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Note from the admins at NavyDEP:
When visiting Great Lakes, please support Sarge's Taxi Service
Sarge is the only taxi that gives back to our sailors and their families. He also hosts the PIR (boot camp graduation) Meet & Greet where
families celebrate the night before your sailor graduates.
I can't say enough about Sarge. You will totally love this guy. Guaranteed!!!



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Week 3:
There isn't much to be said about Week 3. Just the usual PT, folding clothes, and preparing for two key inspections coming up in week 4. This whole week was spent practicing Weapons Turnover and Drill and one event called Marlinespike. We would practice with a 9mm pistol that had the firing pin removed and would have to go over the proper procedures for turning it over to the oncoming watch stander.

That brings me to a little introduction to watch standing. There is at least one watch for the compartment 24/7 unless it is secured because of inspections or specific instructions. Watches in our compartment are usually 2 hours long, but in the fleet they can go up to 12 or maybe even more! The watch stander is responsible for the safety and integrity of his or her shipmates. Everything important done in the compartment, whether it was go for a roving tour around the compartment, logging it off spot (messy or not right) due to instruction or training, or even checking temperature) had to be written in the log. Official logs can be used in Captain's Mast cases where disobedient sailors are punished for being ignorant or reckless. An improper watch stand can even result in punishment because it is that person who is supposed to make sure everything is in order. That's about all I will delve into on watch standing.

Now that all of that watch standing is out of the way, our next task was practicing for our first drill inspection. They would play a tape and we would have to execute all of the commands swiftly and efficiently. This tape was basically what is on the graduation schedule so it truly is very important to understand it sooner than later.

The final task of the week was Marlinespike. This is basically preparation for getting the ship underway and mooring it to the pier. In civilian terms it is untying the lines from the ship so it can go out to sea and tying it back up to the pier. There was even a short exercise of a man overboard drill in which I was the lucky one to be the man overboard (I got to hide in the back of the ship). Our division had listening problems all around so we didn't do exceptionally well, but at least it was done with. By this time everything is getting very repetitive with only a couple events each week that are different. Pretty easy stuff...

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3-1 Day:
- Haircuts again. Males get shaven (Navy Style), and females whose hair falls below the bottom edge of the collar get another haircut. You pay for it, so it's you. I'd say females cut it short before coming!
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3-2 Day:
- Classifications - Ratings if you are Nuke or AECF or do not have a specific rating only. You will list the order of what you rating you want etc. You should find out the following week what the Navy decideds to give you. (Note: this is only for people in Nuke, AECF, or do not have a rating when coming in).
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3-3 Day:
- Study Time
- Weapons computer based training. You complete the course and print out the certificate. You must score 100%.
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3-4 Day:
- Seamanship Basic Skills class
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3-5 Day:
- Marlinspike. You get to practice the seamanship skills learned the day before. Important to know all roles because they will come in handy for Battle Stations.

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Week 4:
This is probably the second-most eventful week in boot camp. The second training day of this week is spent at a firing range. Don't expect to shoot real bullets yet though. This day is an introduction to the 9 millimeter pistol (watch turnover weapon) and the shotgun and their components. You will then fire electronic weapons and will probably do very bad at it because I don't believe any kind of laser to screen targeting is too accurate. This introduction course is known as Small Arms Marksmanship Training (SAMT).

The next training day after SAMT is the real stuff. Time to prove what you are made of with a little pistol. It's.....LIVEFIRE! With distances ranging from 3-15 yards and hand positions to keep it switched up, you have at maximum 4 rounds (which is a lot) to earn your second ribbon. Your first ribbon is the National Defense Service Ribbon (well...medal and ribbon). You may only earn a medal in pistol shooting if you achieve an Expert rating. You will also hear something at the beginning of the week called "Breaking Blue." This instance is when you are doing something with the gun that you aren't supposed to be doing, ie. pointing the gun other than at the target. I was afraid the whole week that I was going to get sent back a week in training for this infraction, but in reality, the instructors seemed pretty lenient and unless you actually point the gun at their face, you are going to be fine. You will most likely make it out with your second ribbon, whether its Marksman, Sharpshooter (S), or Expert (E).

The second to last major event of this week is the Drill Inspection. With more than 2 weeks to practice for this event, the inspection should go pretty smoothly. You march down to the Pacific Fleet Drill Hall which is pretty far from any of the barracks and then you execute all of the commands from the videotape inside the drill hall. You are inspected even on the way there, but the division is not inspected on the way back.

Our last event of week 4 is the second academic test which is over Marlinespike terms, U.S. Naval History, gun components, and a few other things. All of these events sum up what I thought was the most stressful week in boot camp.

Week 4 is also known a "hell week". This is where everything the recruits has learned to date is tested. Several things happen. They wake up the recruits at 3:30am to get them ready for the day's activities. They bring in RDC's from other divisions and they compare their division to your division. They see how well you learned. Most RDC don't like to admit that your division is better so they find the simplest of faults to penalize you. These penalty points are called "Hits" in the Navy. Don't confuse a "hit" as someone is beating you. It's just a figure of speech. NO ONE CAN PHYSICALLY HIT (strike) YOU. You might have a small string hanging out of your pocket...hit (-1 point) You might not have your "gig line" straight...hit (now -2 points).

By getting so many hits, the recruits RDC's are ticked. You'll get Physical Trained (PT) and Intensive Trained (IT). You will get reinspected too. You will be standing at attention and parade rest for a long time waiting for your turn to be inspected. Don't think this is punishment, think of it as teaching the recruits. You will learn to stand for long periods by keeping your knees unlocked! ALWAYS KEEP YOUR KNEE'S UNLOCKED!!!! What these RDC's don't want is during the PIR for the sailors to faint in front of the crowd. It's bad press. (that's where the jobs of the "bodysnatcher" come into play). Those that are really taking hits (penalty points) during the inspection could be rolled back (set back) into another division to relearn what they have already been taught. They all must meet the same standards because they are a team! If one team member is not performing, they move them to another division (a week or two behind them) so they can learn it again.

A lot of people think "Hell Week" is a untouched term used only for the SEAL/BUDS training. However, people fail to realize that "Hell Week" originated long before the SEALS ever came about. In fact, the term was used since the 1800's. I do think the SEAL/BUDS guys are very fond of the word and added to their own vocabulary just like college students, police officers, etc.

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4-1 Day:
- PFA for Olympic Flag, no more than 10-15 people can fail.
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4-2 Day:
- SAMT Laser gun training
- Zone Inspection
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4-3 Day:
- Live Fire 9mm and Shotgun. You need to score 180 or more to receive a ribbon/medal for uniform.
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4-4 Day:
- Drill inspection for Drill Flag
- Photo's
- Photo's and Navy "yearbook" division in house compartment pictures
- Tailor #2 (individual Dress uniforms
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4-5 Day:
- Thrift Savings Plan class
- Test #2
- Go to NEX for shampoo and conditioner
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Week 5:
Week 5 is all learning about firefighting. Topics you will cover include:

Shipboard Damage Control
How to Read Bullseyes (locations of compartments and fittings)
Classes of Fires
Equipment for fighting Fires
Survival Equipment
Confidence Chamber (fun, fun)
Fighting a Simulated Fire

Shipboard damage control consisted of a little bit of everything mentioned. You will learn what X-ray, yoke, and zebra fittings mean. A quick rundown is that out at sea, the ship is set to X-ray meaning that doors marked with an X are supposed to be closed at all times unless logged open in a place called Damage Control Central. There is an exception if there is a "Man Overboard" as you need to take the quickest route to where you muster. If a ship is set to Zebra, most likely the ship is about entirely on lockdown due to a hazardous reason or practice for that. You may hear of the term "Battle Stations", but it is called General Quarters on the ship. Someone will talk over the 1MC (speakerphone located all over the ship) and say that it is General Quarters and all hands are to man their battle stations.

It is an absolute necessity to learn how to read a bulls-eye. Here is a picture below and I will tell you what it all means:




The top line is a must know if you are to find your way around any ship.

The beginning number is what deck or level you are on. The quarterdeck will be on the main deck which is always 1. 1 is your starting point. If you go one ladderwell below this deck, you are on the 2nd deck. Going one ladderwell above the 1st deck and you will be on the O1 level. O is the letter and not a number.

The second number tells you the frame of the ship that you are at. By looking at the number 202, I can tell that most likely this is an aircraft carrier as they go up to 250 or so frames. If you were to read 10 or 20, you would be at the front of the ship.

The next number is also very important as you can tell which side of the ship you are on. Even numbers designate port side, while odd numbers designate starboard side. An easy way to remember this is (PESO) Port is Even, Starboard is Odd. As the numbers get bigger, the further you are from the middle of the ship. The zero in the pictures tells me that it is at the middle of the ship going from starboard to port.

The last letter is not as important as the 3 numbers before it. This letter simply designates the type of space it is. The L in the pictures stands for living space.

There are 4 types of fires aboard Navy ships: Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, and Delta.

Alpha is the most common being ordinary combustibles, like paper.
Bravo is your liquids such as oil and fuel.
Charlie is the electrical equipment.
Delta is combustible metals such as if an aircraft is on fire.

You will learn how to locate and operate numerous types of survival equipment including EEBD's and SCBA's. It is vital that you pay attention when they tell you how to use them.

Near the end of the week you will have the "confidence chamber" which is a nice way of saying gas chamber. It was one of the worst feelings of my life. I recommend trying to sneak holding in your breath as breathing the gas in will make you gag and your eyes aren't really affected too much.

The last day will consist of fighting a couple of fake fires with your division. It's kind of fun, but it gets hot and sweaty so be prepared!
-------------------------------
5-1 Day:
- Basic Damage Control
- Portable DC Pumps (evacuating water)
-------------------------------
5-2 Day:
- EEBD/SEED
- OBA/SCBA

Note from Craig:
I don't normally add comments, but now we are getting into areas that you guys haven't a clue. So I will explain some of the acronyms when I think you guys won't understand.

EEBD = Emergency Escape Breathing Device
It provides the wearer with 15 minutes of breathable air. It is to be worn until you can get topside during evacuation from below deck spaces. The EEBD is designed to provide respiratory and eye protection in an atmosphere that will not support life. With the proper training you should be able to activate and don an EEBD in less than 30 seconds.
EEBDs are not to be used for firefighting purposes.
-------------------------------
SEED = Supplemental Emergency Egress Device
Personnel working in engineering spaces wear supplemental emergency egress devices (SEEDs) on their belts for easy access. When a main space fire is called away, the watch stander should use the SEED to proceed to an EEBD. The watch stander should obtain an EEBD and don it when not in danger of immediate harm from heat or flames. Because the SEED lacks protection for the eyes and nose and has a short operational time, it is a supplemental device. However, it is immediately available for the engineering watch standers and is easily operated on the run.
-------------------------------
OBA = Oxygen-Breathing Apparatuses
The oxygen breathing apparatus (OBA) is a self-contained device that generates oxygen through a chemical process and lets the wearer breathe independently of the surrounding atmosphere. Currently, the OBA is the primary tool used by firefighting teams. The effective time limit of the oxygen supply is in excess of 45 minutes. For personnel protection you should set the timer for 30 minutes, allowing 15 minutes to leave the area and return to fresh air.
-------------------------------
SCBA = self-contained breathing apparatuses
SCBA are less bulky than OBA's and allows for greater ease of movement and has a cylinder of compressed air that Sailors carry on their back instead of the bulky OBA canisters which were carried on the Sailor's chest. The SCBAs also have a gauge with constant pressure so fire fighters know how much compressed air they have left. They have carbon fiber version of cylinders with either 30 or 45 minutes of compressed air.
In addition, SCBAs are much quicker and easier to refill. The SCBA's cylinders can be refilled with compressed air and then reused. In fact, the quick-fill adapter can hook straight up to a fill station, and without even taking the pack off, can be refilled. Since Sailors are now dealing with a compressed air cylinder on their back, they must be more cautious of movement.
Both OBA and SCBA are used to fight fires aboard ships
-------------------------------
5-3 Day:
- Chemistry and Classes of Fires
- Portable + Fixed Extinguishing systems

Note from Craig:
I personally have had to fight only one major (and a few minor) fire's in the entire time I was in the Navy. The two things that totally make you butt shrink (and maybe even stink) up is if they call a Class "D" fire because then are so hard to fight, and, if they call General Quarter which means you are totally screwed, it's a MAJOR fire. These are the words you'll hear over the 1MC (ships announcement speaker) that just makes you fear everything:
When you hear over the 1MC "lube oil leak, lube oil leak, we have a lube oil leak in compartment blah, blah blah"....To be shortly followed by "ding, ding ding, ding ,ding, Fire! Fire! Fire!, we have a fire in compartment blah, blah, blah"...Next followed by "General Quarters, General Quarters, This is Not a drill, repeat this is NOT a drill...."
Here is how most sailors learn the fire meanings:
Saying:
- A = Ash
- B = Boil
- C = Circuit
- D = Deadly
Class A extinguishers are for ordinary combustible materials such as paper, wood, cardboard, and most plastics. Usually leave White Smoke.
Class B fires involve flammable or combustible liquids such as gasoline, kerosene, grease and oil. Usually leaves Black Smoke.
Class C fires involve electrical equipment, such as appliances, wiring, circuit breakers and outlets. Never use water to extinguish class C fires - the risk of electrical shock is far too great!
Class D fire extinguishers are commonly found in a chemical laboratory. They are for fires that involve combustible metals, such as magnesium, titanium, potassium and sodium. However, in the galley a Deep Fat Fryers fires would be a fire since you need to use special precautions. Class D fires are special and usually more deadly than the others. D=Death
-------------------------------
5-4 Day:
- CBR (Chemical, Biological, and Radiological)
-------------------------------
5-5 Day:
- General Fire Fighting + Fire Party Organizations
-------------------------------
Week 6:
This will be the last full week that I will write. It is getting so busy here and since I'm not allowed to talk about any of the events that occur at Battle Stations 21 to anyone that hasn't undertaken it yet, I will stop here. Yes, I know I can talk to you, but since you can't use the information on your NavyDEP website, I will use my time ironing my clothes. Man my mom would really freak out with me saying that. ~ha

All 5 days will have a test. This is a potentially stressful week especially for the people who have worried about that ever-important run in the PFA. I will list the tests now.
Final Comprehensive Test: This will be the last computer based test of 50 questions summarizing what you learned in Firefighting. This is strictly all forms of damage control. Make sure that you have paid attention in the weeks prior. This was the worst test. I believe I scored a 4.4 so that means I missed 6 questions. Not bad, but if you pay attention during the classes, you can do better than that mark.

Drill Inspection 2: This will be the same inspection as the one in week 4. You will form up as a division, march to the drill hall, and go through the tape that you have practiced for weeks.

Final PFA: This is the last of 3 PFA's and a must-pass for anyone who wants to have a chance to become a US Navy Sailor. I ran my best time of 11:20 (I hate running ~ha) so I was pretty stoked to know that I got through the most mentally blocking part of my boot camp: worrying about passing the PFA. If you do fail any of the parts of it, you will have a chance to redo it until Battle Stations. Just remember to get your practice running before boot camp.

Static Zone Inspection: This is the zone inspection that no one knows is coming. I was lucky enough to record the hits that the FQA Chief was pointing out. I was even awarded a Bravo Zulu chit for it though it didn't matter much. Make sure to have your gear stowed correctly for one last time with nothing hanging out, and the RDC's should be more lenient on your racks if you do well.

Uniform Inspection. Our division was split up into 4 sections with each section wearing a different uniform: the NSU's (navy service uniforms) also known as "peanut butter's", the navy camo is NWU's (navy working uniforms), Service dress whites, and Service dress blues. You have a certain amount of time to prepare again, and are read one last question that pertains to BMR, chain of command, 11 general orders, etc.

You have completed week 6! Once again...I can't tell anyone who hasn't done Battle Stations 21 about the aforementioned subject. I am legally bound so I am not giving anything away. It is for you, the aspiring sailor, to find out. I have done what I can to give you a head start. It's up to you to decide that you want to serve your country that bad enough.
-------------------------------
6-1 Day: - Final PFA- Learning about the Mask, Chemical Uniform Number 2 (MCU-2/P) Gas Mask.



-------------------------------
6-2 Day: - Final written test- Learning about how to don (put on) the Mask, Chemical Uniform Number 2 (MCU-2/P) Gas Mask
-------------------------------
6-3 Day:- It's Gas Chamber day!!!! Got a stuffed up nose? You won't after smelling this CS gas. Make sure you don't rub your eyes, it makes it worse! Woo-hoo for Gas Chamber day!
-------------------------------
6-4 Day:- We are starting to learn how to march in the building were PIR will take place.

- Battlestation's is in a couple days. I'm not scared, I am trained, but it is still bothering me if we will actually pass and get out of here. I just need to remind myself that people go to prison for this long and they are just limited to a small area, here we are not that limited. I'm sure glad I chose this path instead of the prison path. Thanks for being there for me Craig, when my parents weren't. They were totally against the military, and you shown me that I could indeed make it, and be successful. I know I will pass Battle stations and will be so proud to be called a sailor! Your NavyDEP website really helped me out. Thank you!
-------------------------------
How does NavyDEP provide help to future sailors?

It's through your help!


NavyDEP has combined forces with a start up company called PIRGifts.com. It's a start up company and is fresh and new (just like your future sailor!).

Being a sailor, I know what sailors want. I have helped this PIrgifts get started by designing the very 1st Challenge Coin for sailors that have been to Navy boot camp at Great Lakes. A portion of their profits (35 cents) will come back to NavyDEP to help me pay for web hosting, software upgrades, and all the other things that come with owning a website. Believe me, I truly don't need the 35 cent, but its nice to know that they understand by helping this website, they are helping future sailors. I want to maintain that link. Heck, if they become a multi-Million dollar company, maybe they make a huge forum to help more deppers understand the Navy life.

I am actually in the process of writing an Power Point slide show explaining the coin. Boot camp is the only time you can't earn a challenge coin, which is why it's always missing from all sailors collection and/or shadow box. It's the blank that needs to be filled.

The 1st coin produced is the USS Triton - Ship 12 (Released June 15th, 2012)
The 2nd coin produced is the USS John F. Kennedy - Ship 9 (Released July 15th, 2012)
The 3rd coin produced is the USS Chicago - Ship 7 (Released August 10th, 2012)
The 4th coin produced is the USS Arizona - Ship 14 (Release September 20th, 2012)

All coins are being sold on Ebay. Just search for ship name and number. Example "USS Triton" and "Ship 12"

By buying this, you are actually helping a lot of sailors that are feeding into boot camp pipeline. As you know, I have kept NavyDEP free of advertisement since the beginning in 2008. However, this is one item that I truly think every sailor wants, and deserves to get. What better way than filling a sailors need?

Please pass this on to the others. I would appreciate it.
Craig - NavyDEP admin.

You can buy these coins on Ebay

Search Ebay for:
USS Triton - Ship 12
USS John F. Kennedy - Ship 9
USS Chicago - Ship 7

This 3D coin was exclusively made for PIRGifts under a license agreement with a major coin manufacturer/mint.
The design was developed by a very knowledgeable member of the U.S. Navy who knowledge on all facets of the Navy and Navy life is truly remarkable.
This is a great gift for those that have made the transition from civilian life to becoming a sailor in the world's greatest Navy..... Hooyah.... Go Navy!!!!....
This coin is 1-3/4 inch.
As shown, there are two coins. This is just to display the front and back of coin
Each coin is $18.95
Free Shipping within the United States.






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Old 03-16-2009, 07:46 AM   #2
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Great info Craiggers!
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Old 03-16-2009, 08:08 AM   #3
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Yar good stuff. Good to know.
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Old 04-17-2009, 09:54 PM   #4
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this was a great post, you really gave detail and thats what i was looking for thanks!!
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Old 11-04-2010, 06:05 PM   #5
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Thank you for that!! I passed it on.
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Old 12-16-2010, 05:51 PM   #6
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This is the best info I've read about bootcamp. I'm going to read it over and over, so when I get there I would have a clue of what is going to happen. Thank you very much.
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Old 12-16-2010, 08:23 PM   #7
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That was written by a Nuke sailor. She was on this website for probably 4 months before she left for bootcamp. We pumped her up with so much info that when she got there, she knew everything.... She had it soooo easy because she knew what was coming at her next.

She actaully wrote each day and sent my wife and I letters of the entire picture. She solved the puzzle. I actually posted that on other website for a mom that was totally freaking out. It made her so calm when her son had his wisdom teeth taken out on the day that was written. She then knew the plan, and never had a problem again.

Life at bootcamp is just like a train. You have three options:
1. Stand on the railroad tracks and get run over - Which means, you try to stop the process. You can't stop the process, so go with it.

2. You can move off the track and watch the train pass you up - Which means, while your friends move ahead and learn the Navy to be successful in their careers, you are standing to the side wondering what you should do next. Basically, get with the program. If 50,000 recruits can pass each year, what make you any different from them?

3. Hop on the train and go with it - By this, I mean, whatever the problem is, do your best. If at the end of the day you can say "I did my best today", then you have done your job. Everyone in life has a "Weak Link", there is always something you will have trouble with. Learn to overcome those problems and continuing moving down the track.
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Old 09-12-2011, 10:08 PM   #8
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Default Thank you for this bulletin!

I really appreciate the detail of this experience from you. Unfortunately I am still waiting to dep in because of medical reasons. In regards to the naval history, is the blue jacket manual a good reference for preparing for the exam?

Last edited by Craig; 09-13-2011 at 09:09 AM. Reason: Removed day per day schedule to free up webspace
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Old 09-13-2011, 09:13 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Black87 View Post
I really appreciate the detail of this experience from you. Unfortunately I am still waiting to dep in because of medical reasons. In regards to the naval history, is the blue jacket manual a good reference for preparing for the exam?
You really need to look at these two manuals, They are alot better than the Blue Jackets manual.
http://www.cnrc.navy.mil/documents/start_guide.pdf
and
http://www.navydep.com/forums/showthread.php?t=283
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Old 10-13-2011, 10:29 AM   #10
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Great info this makes me a little less nervous and a little more prepared....
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Old 10-13-2011, 09:22 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FS_Thompson View Post
Great info this makes me a little less nervous and a little more prepared....
Hey, that's what we're here for.... You will know everything before it happens. The others that haven't been looking at the forums will have a real hard time.
For you, you will just sit back and laugh to yourself knowing what is next....
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Old 11-04-2011, 09:34 AM   #12
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Default Saturday?

What about Saturdays? And are all Sundays the same??

This schedule is AWESOME by the way - I really don't even understand why the Navy doesn't publish a general BC schedule -- Other branches do (well, I know of one for sure ... NOT that I'm comparing ...)
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Old 11-05-2011, 01:18 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by traceywashere View Post
What about Saturdays? And are all Sundays the same??

This schedule is AWESOME by the way - I really don't even understand why the Navy doesn't publish a general BC schedule -- Other branches do (well, I know of one for sure ... NOT that I'm comparing ...)
Tracey -
The Navy doesn't publish it because they want you stressed out. They are trying to find those that can handle the military, and those that can't. If a sailor knows what's coming at them, then they have it easy, they know how to plan for it. Those that don't have a real hard time. For example, you know about the "Moment-of-Truth", you know not to stand up. But those that haven't checked out the various deppers forums will probably end up standing up, and end up getting booted out of the Navy.
I made this website to help you deppers. I want all of you to succeed in the Navy. I want your time in boot camp enjoyable. Why stress? Just laugh to yourself because you know what is next. My son was raised around my friends and he knew the Navy inside and out. While others were in boot camp freaking out, he was having fun doing stupid stuff. He had a really fun time. Why? Because he knew their plan. He knew exactly what they were looking for....

Next....
Saturday is a full training day. Sunday is a non-training day

Every recruit must finish 40 training days, which are broken into eight five-day weeks. Day 1-1 means "Week 1 Day 1" and Day 6-3 means "Week 6 Day 3." Each training day has a specified activity. Firefighting is on a certain day of training, so is weapons qualifications and division pictures. This helps the Navy keep from having too many divisions trying to do one activity on a single day. Example, the can't have 900 recruits in the pool at the same time. Divisions cannot "skip forward" because there are other divisions using the training room or equipment needed.

Typically there are two to four divisions on each training day. If Div 001 -003 starts day 1-1 on Monday, then Div 004-006 begins day 1-1 on Tuesday, etc.

Holidays do NOT count as training day. So if there is a holiday the next Monday, Day 2-1 will be on Tuesday. For December recruits holidays will include Christmas, New Year's, Martin Luther King Jr Day, President's Day and one other (I forget what it is). Some recruits may be at Great Lakes for as long as 10 weeks before PIR. Four fewer days of training due to holidays can mean an extra week of boot camp.

You may ask, if holidays aren't counted toward training, and they only get a half-day off for holidays, what are they doing that other half-day? Probably practicing their marching, or having uniform or locker inspections, or doing PT. You would not believe how much time is spent on practicing making and unmaking a bed (The Navy Way™) . And ironing lessons. And clothes folding lessons. Not all training is scheduled classroom work.
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Old 11-05-2011, 09:23 AM   #14
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wow! thank you SO much ...
so .. you're saying that day 1 of each week basically rolls?? ... like say week 1 started on a monday, then week 2 would start on a saturday, then friday, then thursday, etc ... eliminating Sundays and holidays as official training days.

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Old 11-09-2011, 01:32 AM   #15
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quick question, I leave on the 10th omg it's tomorrow... and anyway, I've been hearing that they shut down some parts of boot camp for christmas, what happens in the holiday time?
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Old 11-09-2011, 04:52 AM   #16
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My son was there over Christmas. Because he was PIR early in the New Year, he and the other Sailors that were PIR at that time were adopted out to community groups in the area and had a really nice day. It included a nice Christmas dinner, going to see a movie and a few other things. I'm hoping that they're still doing that for the Sailors.
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Old 11-09-2011, 11:13 AM   #17
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They USED to be able to have family members see their sailors during that time...my son did back in the day...his brother went there and took him out for the day. From what I hear now, they can sign up to go with a church group for meals and fun..the list is given to the sailors to pick from I think about 3 weeks prior. They stopped the families as it got to a point too many were VERY late getting back to base! Some even went AWOL, so ruined it for eveyone else.
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Old 11-09-2011, 12:44 PM   #18
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So Sue - your son was also there over Christmas and was treated to a really nice day too, eh? It made his day better also I'm sure.
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Old 01-19-2012, 06:22 AM   #19
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Default My son just left yesterday

I wish I knew about this thread before he left. He is EOD, and has had a lot of training friends fill him in about Boot Camp the last year, and our neighbors kid just graduated 12-27 so he does have some insight for what to expect. He has been physically training for a long time and in good shape.

Thank you for this site...

Mom
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Old 01-19-2012, 09:14 AM   #20
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I read this a few days ago and had my son read it too. He got to day 4 and must have got tired of reading!

Got a question about P-1 to P-2. My son arrived last night and called his mom at 12 midnight PST--2AM in GL. Is this considered P-1? P-2 will be 00:00 Friday morning?

If he has a full division I hope to follow his day to day routine starting with his arrival this morning. Whoever wrote all this down, thank you!!
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Old 01-19-2012, 10:58 AM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ZachsDad View Post
I read this a few days ago and had my son read it too. He got to day 4 and must have got tired of reading!

Got a question about P-1 to P-2. My son arrived last night and called his mom at 12 midnight PST--2AM in GL.
I tried to get my son to read this too but he was too focused on just getting there. He called me at 1am EST, so midnight GL time. From your post they must have had a lot of recruits if he called you 2 hours later.

Good luck to yours,,, This certainly isnt easy..

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Old 02-07-2012, 10:19 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craig View Post
Tracey -
The Navy doesn't publish it because they want you stressed out. They are trying to find those that can handle the military, and those that can't. If a sailor knows what's coming at them, then they have it easy, they know how to plan for it. Those that don't have a real hard time. For example, you know about the "Moment-of-Truth", you know not to stand up. But those that haven't checked out the various deppers forums will probably end up standing up, and end up getting booted out of the Navy.
I made this website to help you deppers. I want all of you to succeed in the Navy. I want your time in boot camp enjoyable. Why stress? Just laugh to yourself because you know what is next. My son was raised around my friends and he knew the Navy inside and out. While others were in boot camp freaking out, he was having fun doing stupid stuff. He had a really fun time. Why? Because he knew their plan. He knew exactly what they were looking for....

Next....
Saturday is a full training day. Sunday is a non-training day

Every recruit must finish 40 training days, which are broken into eight five-day weeks. Day 1-1 means "Week 1 Day 1" and Day 6-3 means "Week 6 Day 3." Each training day has a specified activity. Firefighting is on a certain day of training, so is weapons qualifications and division pictures. This helps the Navy keep from having too many divisions trying to do one activity on a single day. Example, the can't have 900 recruits in the pool at the same time. Divisions cannot "skip forward" because there are other divisions using the training room or equipment needed.

Typically there are two to four divisions on each training day. If Div 001 -003 starts day 1-1 on Monday, then Div 004-006 begins day 1-1 on Tuesday, etc.

Holidays do NOT count as training day. So if there is a holiday the next Monday, Day 2-1 will be on Tuesday. For December recruits holidays will include Christmas, New Year's, Martin Luther King Jr Day, President's Day and one other (I forget what it is). Some recruits may be at Great Lakes for as long as 10 weeks before PIR. Four fewer days of training due to holidays can mean an extra week of boot camp.

You may ask, if holidays aren't counted toward training, and they only get a half-day off for holidays, what are they doing that other half-day? Probably practicing their marching, or having uniform or locker inspections, or doing PT. You would not believe how much time is spent on practicing making and unmaking a bed (The Navy Way™) . And ironing lessons. And clothes folding lessons. Not all training is scheduled classroom work.
I'm so glad someone asked about Saturdays, because I had the same question! But, let me make sure I understand your reply....My granddaughter arrived at boot camp on Feb 1st, so that counts as "P-1" for her, right? And if so, then the following Saturday will be 1-1 (week 1, day 1) of official boot camp...is that correct?
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Old 02-09-2012, 04:04 PM   #23
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It all depends on what day her division picked up, and how long they'll be in in-processing. Average is 1 week of P days, but some do go longer and some go shorter. When I went through I did all the P Days stuff crammed into 4 days, but that's very unusual. Once you start hearing from her you'll be able to get a better idea of what DOT she's on.
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Old 03-24-2012, 09:23 AM   #24
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Just a note.

As of sometime in October, recruits are no longer issued guardbelts and canteens. Instead, they are issued a black (extremely durable and good quality) backpack and a 32 oz. Nalgene bottle.
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Old 03-25-2012, 11:23 PM   #25
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Thank you so much for this post!! It really helped me not worry so much.
I know my son is doing fine but to know what is going on day to day is a huge help.
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Old 03-27-2012, 07:54 AM   #26
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Quote:
- Classifications - Ratings if you are Nuke or AECF or do not have a specific rating only. You will list the order of what you rating you want etc. You should find out the following week what the Navy decideds to give you. (Note: this is only for people in Nuke, AECF, or do not have a rating when coming in).
I heard for SECF you do not do this until the beginning of sub school. Can anyone comment?

Also, this might sound like a stupid question. But do the people I ship out of Brooklyn MEPS be in the same division as I am in Basic? And further, do you train in basic with the people you will go to A school with? How big is a division in basic?
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Old 03-28-2012, 10:32 PM   #27
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I heard for SECF you do not do this until the beginning of sub school. Can anyone comment?

Also, this might sound like a stupid question. But do the people I ship out of Brooklyn MEPS be in the same division as I am in Basic? And further, do you train in basic with the people you will go to A school with? How big is a division in basic?
Most of the time the people you leave for boot camp will be in different division while in boot camp. You have the Triple threat division (band, choir and rifles) aka 900's division, you have the special Ops division aka 800's division, and then you have the regular division.
However, if you went in under the "Buddy Program", then your buddy will be with you all the way through "A" school.
Most division start out with about 85 people, but it soon goes down as people drop or get set back in training. But remember, your division also picks up people when the get set back from the division ahead of you.

Normally, you'll end up with about 70 sailors graduation. However, with that said, my son's division as only 40 since 32 sailors were sent back in training 3 days prior to PIR for goofing off (and getting caught).
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Old 03-29-2012, 01:04 AM   #28
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They may or may not end up in your division. Its a random assortment. One way or another you're gonna meet and get to know people in boot and you will all become a family and a team. Because the socializing in boot camp is such a non-factor, you all just kind of come together on your own without even knowing it. Of course, it is possible that has something to do with showering with all 80 other guys........

Divisions usually start out with between 75-85 people and the numbers go down as people leave the navy or get ASMO'd (set back). As for what rates, you'll meet people with all kinds of jobs and rates. Some of them will be going to A school with you, others won't. You'll find out who's going where pretty quick. You guys will be together for a while (same A school), especially if there's a lot of you in your division that's the same rate; its just the way timing and numbers work out.
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Old 03-30-2012, 03:09 PM   #29
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Excellent thread, Craig! Thank you so much for all the information on what to expect at RTC!
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Old 04-08-2012, 01:22 AM   #30
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This is extremely helpful, thank you! I am shipping next month and have been trying to find out more about what happens at basic - this is the best description I've found by far.
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Old 04-25-2012, 06:32 PM   #31
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At what point does the opportunity to volunteer for SPECWAR/SPECOPS (in my case, EOD) come up?
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Old 04-25-2012, 11:45 PM   #32
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At what point does the opportunity to volunteer for SPECWAR/SPECOPS (in my case, EOD) come up?
It is my understanding that going EOD is a rate you go to bootcamp with not one you volunteer for later according to this: http://www.navy.com/careers/special-operations/eod.html
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Old 04-26-2012, 09:50 AM   #33
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Sweetmtn, I've done the research on this subject

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...9202448AAS0ibo

I have read something to this extent on numerous forums. Just curious as to the actual timing of the NSW/NSO presentation/pst. Thanks
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Old 04-26-2012, 02:25 PM   #34
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It will be done when you go to take your swim test, about 1-3 day
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Old 04-26-2012, 07:26 PM   #35
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Got a question, in Week 5 it's posted/listed they do the "Confidence" Chamber but then I see on 6-3 it says 'Gas Chamber'. So do they do the "Confidence"/Gas Chamber in week 5 or week 6?

Also does anyone happen to know if they can't do the Live Fire will they ever be able to make that up or they just don't get a ribbon for it? My son wrote he got pink eye, in his 22 yrs he has never had it LOL, and wasn't going to be able to the Live Fire. I'm really sad for him, he was looking forward to that.
Thanks
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Old 04-26-2012, 11:28 PM   #36
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It will be done when you go to take your swim test, about 1-3 day
If that swim test is anything like the SEALS and SWCC have to do, your swim strokes must be PERFECT!
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Old 04-27-2012, 08:29 AM   #37
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Live fire is a mandatory activity at bootcamp. We also had someone miss it due to pink eye. He had to make it up after he was cleared as FFD (Fit for Full Duty) from medical. You can not graduate until you have done live fire. If there is not enough time for him to make it up, he will be ASMO'd to another division that has not done live fire and will do it with them.

Also, the Special Programs brief is between the swim test brief and actual swim test. The recruits who volunteer to try out for special programs are taken away to do their pushups, situps, run, swim, and pull ups, while everyone will stay and do the standard Class 3 swim test. Sorry about the confusion!
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Old 04-27-2012, 10:39 AM   #38
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You CAN graduate without doing live fire. They will try to get it made up for you, but if they can't they can't. In those cases you will graduate as long as the recruit participated in all the classroom portions of firearms training except the actual pulling the trigger. They do need to be present at live fire however. If thats the case they will complete the training requirements and graduate boot. If they miss it from being SIQ or anything though they will have to either make it up or ASMO back to get the training. They usually make it up. If they don't shoot but take the courses they will not have a marksmanship ribbon. You also may not get the ribbon if you shoot twice and both scores are below ribbon qualifying. Those are the only people who will not have a marksmanship ribbon at PIR, those who didn't shoot and those who didn't get a qualifying score. Mostly its those who didn't shoot.
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Old 04-27-2012, 01:50 PM   #39
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Thanks prop827 and Nuke guy
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Old 04-27-2012, 02:05 PM   #40
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Frazer, check out this link for what you would have to do to pass the physical tests:
http://www.stewsmith.com/linkpages/navyspecops.htm
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Old 04-29-2012, 11:22 PM   #41
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Thanks sweetmtn, I'm well aware of what the minimums are and have been working at handily exceeding them for months now. Sucks that P-days are going to be essentially PT free. Shipping tomorrow so I'll see ya'll in the fleet.
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Old 06-20-2012, 04:47 PM   #42
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Hi All! Hope all is well! This is really very nice! I hope we were able to read this before my hubby left for bootcamp. I'm thinking of mailing this info to him, do you think this is ok? Would he get in trouble if they (RDC) see this mailed to him? Thanks in advance!
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Old 06-20-2012, 08:55 PM   #43
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Hi All! Hope all is well! This is really very nice! I hope we were able to read this before my hubby left for bootcamp. I'm thinking of mailing this info to him, do you think this is ok? Would he get in trouble if they (RDC) see this mailed to him? Thanks in advance!
Not a good idea to mail this to him there, he could get in some trouble if his RDC's see it.
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Old 06-21-2012, 12:51 PM   #44
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Not a good idea to mail this to him there, he could get in some trouble if his RDC's see it.
Yikes! Yeah, that's what I thought. I've printed it out but didn't mail it. Oh well. Thanks for the reply Sweetmtn! Appreciate it!
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Old 06-23-2012, 12:30 PM   #45
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thank you so much this posting was veryyy helpful! my soon to be sailor left tues. the 19 but got to great lakes around 24:00 when i got "the call' i just wanted to know how long does it take for the box to leave great lakes. i know u mentioned by wk 3 -4 we should receive the letter but when do we receive personal letters from our future sailors and are all divisions granted another call sometime through BC ?
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Old 06-23-2012, 04:54 PM   #46
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thank you so much this posting was veryyy helpful! my soon to be sailor left tues. the 19 but got to great lakes around 24:00 when i got "the call' i just wanted to know how long does it take for the box to leave great lakes. i know u mentioned by wk 3 -4 we should receive the letter but when do we receive personal letters from our future sailors and are all divisions granted another call sometime through BC ?
Generally the first letter you will get it the form letter, but you should get a personal one soon after or about the same time. Note what day it arrives as all letters are mailed from boot on Mondays, so you should get a letter on the same day each week. As far as phone calls, yes they will get a chance to call home again, but sometimes they are only earned, depends on the RDC and how things go in that division. You will get a phone call generally at least near the end so make sure you always have your cell phone with you! many years ago my son was able to call me 3 times during boot total.
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Old 10-19-2012, 04:08 PM   #47
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There's a very high chance that I'll be celebrating my birthday in the gas chamber. >_<
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Old 10-19-2012, 07:14 PM   #48
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There's a very high chance that I'll be celebrating my birthday in the gas chamber. >_<
Well at the very least, there's a unique story to it then!
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Old 10-26-2012, 06:08 PM   #49
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OMG, i leave for Bootcamp on the 3rd of dec, and i am really lucky to have come across this website,this article is really helpful although i am now more scared but its better to know what to expect than nothing at all! Thanks so much for taking time to write in detail this lenghty article! This will definetly be my fav webpage until i ship. Thanks again!
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Old 10-26-2012, 06:09 PM   #50
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I dont think its a good idea lol,he would only get more tense!
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